Dehydrating — 20 February 2013

How To Make Dehydrated Cinnamon Apples

A few weeks ago I bought 90lbs of apples. Click here to see what I did with the first half. The second half I saved for the dehydrator. Home dehydrated apples are ten times better than that gummy chewy stuff you get in the store labeled dried apples.  With the right equipment they are supper easy to slice and dehydrate. It’s not really that hard even if you don’t have the right equipment.  I filled my dehydrator twice. The first time I made plain dehydrated apples and the second time I made cinnamon dehydrated apples.

How To Make Dehydrated Cinnamon Apples

 

90lbs of Apples: Part 2

Here’s How I Make Dehydrated Apples Step by Step:

How To Make Dehydrated Cinnamon Apples

  Wash your apples.

How To Make Dehydrated Cinnamon Apples

This is an apple and potato peeler. It’s not the greatest work of engineering (it has it’s problems) but it’s a lot better than peeling apples by hand, even if it does give you a little trouble once in a while. You don’t have to peel your apples to dehydrate them so if you don’t have one don’t think you have to peel all the apples by hand.

How To Make Dehydrated Cinnamon Apples

 The apple fits on like this.

How To Make Dehydrated Cinnamon Apples

  Here you can see the blade peeling the apple.

How To Make Dehydrated Cinnamon Apples

 Here you can see the apple from a different angle.

How To Make Dehydrated Cinnamon Apples

This gadget also slices apples. That’s really why I use it to dehydrate apples. The slices are all uniform and allows the fruit to be done at the same time. You can find the apple peeler on Amazon here. (see below for update)

How To Make Dehydrated Cinnamon Apples

 Chop the slices in half.

How To Make Dehydrated Cinnamon Apples

 Load up your trays.

How To Make Dehydrated Cinnamon Apples

Apples will oxidize (turn brown) in the dehydrator if you don’t use an anti-oxidizer like lemon juice or citric acid. Although there is nothing wrong with oxidized dehydrated apples my boys would prefer non-brown apples. Since I had a lot of apples to slice I went with lemon juice in a spray bottle. (I learned this trick from dehydrate2store) It worked really well and did not turn the apples sour. In the past I have just soaked the apples in a bowl full of water with added lemon juice and honey. The spray bottle is much faster and easier!

How To Make Dehydrated Cinnamon Apples

Load your dehydrator trays in your dehydrator. I have a 9 tray Excalibur Dehydrator.  My apples took about 8 hours.

How To Make Dehydrated Cinnamon Apples

 This is what they look like when they are done.

To Make Cinnamon Apples:

How To Make Dehydrated Cinnamon Apples

 Fill a plastic bag with apples and add enough cinnamon to coat, about 2T

How To Make Dehydrated Cinnamon Apples

 Shake the bag until all apples are well coated.

How To Make Dehydrated Cinnamon Apples

Place the apples on dehydrator trays. I did not add any anti-oxidizer. Since the apples were already brown from the cinnamon I didn’t see any reason to.

How To Make Dehydrated Cinnamon Apples

 This is what the cinnamon apples look like when they are done.

How To Make Dehydrated Cinnamon Apples

I put the apples in the freezer for two weeks to pasteurize them, then I store them in half gallon canning jars. I use a FoodSaver to vacuum pack them.

How To Make Dehydrated Cinnamon Apples

Here is the attachment I use for the vacuum packing. You can find it on Amazon here. For the half gallon canning jars you need to use the wide mouth jar sealer.

How To Make Dehydrated Cinnamon Apples

 Yum!

Update:

How To Make Dehydrated Cinnamon Apples

As you might have noticed the link above goes to this apple peeler, not the green one I used in the post. While peeling and coring the apples my old apple peeler would act up. It would peel only half of the apple or it would only core the apple half way. After doing some research I decided to purchase the one you see above. It’s more heavy duty than my old one and it had great reviews on Amazon.

How To Make Dehydrated Cinnamon Apples

We peeled 10 apples without a problem so I’m confidant that we will have an easier time next time we dehydrate apples.

Jennifer

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Jennifer

(5) Readers Comments

  1. I just bought a big bag of apples and had no idea what I would do with them. well…the dehydrater will be out tomorrow and I will have lots of good dehydrated apples for the winter. thanks so much for putting this up at just the right time for me.
    I am new to your blog and enjoying it.

  2. I have never heard of putting apples after dehydrated in the freezer for two weeks to pasteurize them. What exactly is the purpose of this? Do you then let them get to room temperature before vacuum sealing them? Do they pick up moisture from the freezer? I’m going to try this method, but wondering the reasoning behind it. I really enjoy reading blog as I do a lot of canning and dehydrating as well.

    • When you dehydrate food you don’t heat the food to a high enough temperature to kill insect eggs or bacteria. Freezing the food in a deep freezer for several weeks takes care of the majority of problems that might arise from bugs and bacteria. It’s not 100% full proof some bacteria freezes just fine and will thaw out and still be active. Obviously the ancient Egyptians did not have freezers but they did live in a very dry climate which is helpful in dehydrating. Since I do not live in a dry climate and I have the freezer option available to me it’s just an extra precaution that I take. In addition I find the freezer continues to dry the food out just a bit and as a result I get food that is very similar to freeze dried. You can put them in the freezer before or after you vacuum seal them. No, I have not had a problem with them picking-up moisture from the freezer. However, if they are not at least 90% dehydrated this could be a problem.

  3. When you peel the apples don’t throw the peels away! Freeze them and use them (with your apples) to make apple butter. They cook so long that the peels turn to mush. Don’t waste a thing!

    • I wouldn’t throw the peels away if these had been organic apples, but they were not. So for that reason I ended up throwing them away.

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